Reminder: Call for Papers for Emerging Discourse Incubator
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Volume 55 Issue 3

 

Original Articles

The Article above has also appeared in our Spotlight Series, in which the article authors discuss their research, the background and theory to the article. Additionally they discuss how their research and findings could impact future research.
We talked to Professor Chris Voss and Professor Henk Akkermans about the paper they recently co-authored with Roeland van Oers titled “Ramp‐up and ramp‐down dynamics in digital services”
“Markets are pressuring companies to develop new services quickly and to get them to market as soon as possible, leading to pressure for rapid deployment and ramp‐ups. Such pressure has increased with the growing digitalisation of services sectors such as banking, insurance and media (McKinsey & Co., 2015). Ramp‐ups of such services usually require a significant commitment of resources, which may cause problems if the available resources do not match the demand growth or if they are diverted from other services and involve ramping up the whole service supply chain.”

The Full Article can be access here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jscm.12189
https://doi.org/10.1111/jscm.12189

The Article above has also appeared in our Spotlight Series, in which the article authors discuss their research, the background and theory to the article. Additionally they discuss how their research and findings could impact future research.
In this weeks spotlight we talk to Thomas Kull about the paper he co-authored with Frank Wiengarten, Damien Power and Piyush Shah entitled “Acting as Expected: Global Leadership Preferences and the Pursuit of an Integrated Supply Chain”
“Supplier selections are complex but nonetheless strategically important decisions that are influenced by numerous factors. Drawing on the resource‐based and relational view of the firm, we investigate how suppliers’ economies of scale influence the buyer's selection decision, and we illustrate how the influence of scale is contingent upon important economic, buyer, and relationship characteristics. We test the model with a large secondary dataset of actual supplier selection decisions from the automotive industry and show that economies of scale have a strongly positive but diminishing effect on the buying firm's supplier selection decision. These effects are reinforced or extenuated by economic, buyer, and relationship characteristics, with characteristics that are more specific to the buyer‐supplier situation (e.g., relationship duration and power balance) having a stronger moderating effect than do characteristics that are more global (e.g., economic cycle). Our research helps suppliers to better understand how to manage selection probabilities with buyers and provides buying firms with a better understanding of how contextual factors affect the benefit of supplier‐provided economies of scale.”

The Full Article can be accessed here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jscm.12208
https://doi.org/10.1111/jscm.12208

The Article above has also appeared in our Spotlight Series, in which the article authors discuss their research, the background and theory to the article. Additionally they discuss how their research and findings could impact future research.
We talked to Kai Hoberg about the paper he co-authored with Florian Badorf, Stephan M. Wagner and Felix Papier entitled “How Supplier Economies of Scale Drive Supplier Selection Decisions”
”Supplier selections are complex but nonetheless strategically important decisions that are influenced by numerous factors. Drawing on the resource‐based and relational view of the firm, we investigate how suppliers’ economies of scale influence the buyer's selection decision, and we illustrate how the influence of scale is contingent upon important economic, buyer, and relationship characteristics. We test the model with a large secondary dataset of actual supplier selection decisions from the automotive industry and show that economies of scale have a strongly positive but diminishing effect on the buying firm's supplier selection decision. These effects are reinforced or extenuated by economic, buyer, and relationship characteristics, with characteristics that are more specific to the buyer‐supplier situation (e.g., relationship duration and power balance) having a stronger moderating effect than do characteristics that are more global (e.g., economic cycle). Our research helps suppliers to better understand how to manage selection probabilities with buyers and provides buying firms with a better understanding of how contextual factors affect the benefit of supplier‐provided economies of scale.”

The full Article can be found here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jscm.12203

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jscm.12203

The Article above has also appeared in our Spotlight Series, in which the article authors discuss their research, the background and theory to the article. Additionally they discuss how their research and findings could impact future research.
We talked to Sebastian J. Garcia Dastugue a Clinical Assistant Professor  at University of Arkansas and Cuneyt Eroglu an Associate Professor at Northeastern University about their research.
“Resource allocation decisions in the areas of service quality and environmental sustainability can be challenging because ex ante it is difficult to assess the potential performance benefits of such investments. This paper investigates the operating performance implications of service quality and environmental sustainability in the context of logistics. Specifically, using the resource‐based view of the firm as the theoretical framework, we examine future operating performance of firms that won service quality and environmental sustainability awards in logistics between 2004 and 2013. Awardees include firms that are logistics service providers and firms that operate in other industries; in all cases, these awards recognize firms’ logistics capabilities. Our results reveal that firms’ service quality and environmental sustainability capabilities, as recognized by winning awards in the respective categories, are associated with improved operating performance during the three‐year post‐award period. Additionally, the performance benefits associated with service quality awards are greater than those associated with environmental sustainability awards. Our analysis further shows that whereas environmental sustainability relates to better future operating performance by enhancing only sales growth, service quality is positively associated with enhanced sales growth as well as cost efficiency. Finally, our results also indicate that positive operating performance implications of these awards are not contingent on the industry competitive intensity or innovative intensity. Implications for research and practice are discussed”

The Full Article can be accessed here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jscm.12185
https://doi.org/10.1111/jscm.12185